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Billiard associations and leagues are billiards-related organizations which exist to support specific groups within the billiards industry. The majority of these are player-oriented, but several exist to support specific vendor and manufacturer organizations.
Bar billiards is played on a small sized table resembling a billiard table. It does not have side and corner pockets, it does have with 9 holes in the playing surface which are assigned certain point values (from 10 to 200). The game is most popular in the United Kingdom, and originated there in the 1930s. It is often played in pubs, as the table requires access from only one end.
This game is very similar to English Billiards, in which points are accrued for "colliding two balls", called cannons. This is different to most cue sport games, in which the object is to actually sink balls. Carom is a game in which the players compete for a pre-determined time period, rather than until the balls have been sunk. It is generally played on an english billiard table, of three quarter size, which is 8 foot x 4 foot.
This category contains sites that involve local leagues and clubs, aimed primarily at the social, amateur player. The site must provide information on a number of clubs or venues, sites pertaining to one venue should submit to the relevant REGIONAL locality.
Sites contained within this category provide detailed instructions on one or more of the disciplines. The information should be regarded as educational in nature and may contain sites that sell materials and equipment. If the site is PRIMARILY involving the sale of materials and equipment, it should be submitted to the relevant category in SHOPPING.
Only sites involving the game of traditional English Billiards, should be submitted here.
English Billiards is a game played on a traditional billiards table and involves the use of three balls. The table size is 12 foot by 6 foot, with 6 holes, commonly referred to as pockets. One white, one spotted white and a red ball. In recent years, the relevant associations have decided to now use one red, one white and one yellow ball. Points are scored for specific actions and in this game, unlike other cue sports, sinking the "object ball" is not the prime intention.
Sites contained within this category should be primarily providing news, results and information on the activities of players within the sport. These sites should provide information on one or more of the disciplines.
This category contains sites that provide information on players involved in the sport. These players should be professional in status, however amateur players that have achieved considerable success and regarded as playing at an elite level, can be included. The player may well participate in numerous disciplines, however they should be listed under the discipline for which they have achieved most recognition.
Sites containing information on Pool, 8 Ball, 9 Ball, Straight Pool and Kelly Pool, may be submitted here. In America, they sometimes refer to this game as Billiards, however this is a coloquial term and any game reflecting the characteristics of pool, although it may be called Billiards, may be listed in here.
Pool is played on a table similar to a billiard table, however far smaller in size. Depending upon the specific game of pool, there are some differences in the cushion rubbers, pockets, ball size and other equipment.
The game of Snooker is played on an English Billiard Table and may be played by two or more persons, either as sides or independently. Points are awarded for scoring strokes and forfeits from an opponent's fouls. The winner is the player or side making the highest score or to whom the game is awarded. Each player uses the same white cue-ball and there are twenty-one object balls, fifteen reds each valued 1 and six colours, yellow valued 2, green 3, brown 4, blue 5, pink 6 and black 7. Scoring strokes are made by potting reds and colours alternately until all the reds are off the table and then the colours in the ascending order of their value, i.e. yellow to black.
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Last update: Saturday, June 27, 2009 4:53:00 PM EDT - edit