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Please submit only sites that deal with adult Jewish education.
Jewish education for adults is more focused on the modern working professional seeking to learn more about Judaism.
Covers Colleges, Universities, and other centers of learning that provide an intensive, Jewish oriented course of learning. Your institution need not be accredited. If your institution qualifies, please submit your institution for this category. This may include Jewish studies programs at universities worldwide. Yeshivas and Midrashot are not to be included here.
Please submit here sites dealing only with Jewish High Schools.

more information (editors only)

General sites dealing with Jewish day school education. Specific day schools for grades K-12 or K-8 should be submitted to the appropriate subcategory.
Please submit only sites that deal with Midrashot in this category.
Midrashot are post high school centers for women interested in studying Judaism on a full-time basis.
This category, and all its subcategories, is only for resources that provide actual learning possibilities, such as courses or weekly lectures, via the Internet, either in html or through email. It is not for information about "real" institutions, or to advertise material that is sold, such as books, pamphlets, or other home material.

The categories are for actual Torah or Judaism learning. Essays about Torah should go in the Judaism/Torah/Essays and Opinions category.

Online Texts should go in Judaism/Torah/Online_Texts

Online Jewish Learning categorizes learning possibilities in Torah and Judaism available on the web, either through e-mail lists or websites.
Jewish religious education for physically handicapped, learning disabled, or mentally retarded students.
Please submit sites only dealing with post-high school or higher Yeshivot for men.
Yeshivot are places of study educating Jews in the laws and ways of the Torah. There are different types of Yeshivas catering to different age groups, religious movements, and ideologies. In general, the term Yeshiva is mostly associated with those institutions catering to men, while the Midrasha is a similar institution for women. Every Yeshiva differs in size and scope, but their main features are the Beit Midrash (the room in the Yeshiva where the learning takes place) and the Rebbe who heads the Yeshiva.
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Last update: Monday, August 4, 2014 12:07:55 PM EDT - edit