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The 1901 American Standard Version was a minor American revision of the English Revised Version of 1881. It became the foundation of several 20th century American versions, including the Revised Standard Version and the New American Standard Bible.
This translation helps explain word meanings with synonyms and definitions set in parentheses and brackets within the text. This can be especially helpful when strict word-for-word translations fail to capture the exact meaning of a word in its original language.
The Authorized Version (AV) of the Bible is popularly known, especially in the United States, as the King James Version (KJV). Based on the Bishops' Bible, the AV is a work of a committee of 54 translators, and was first published in 1611, commissioned by King James I of England. Current printings use the revision of 1769 rather than the original 1611 edition. The AV/KJV is lauded for the beauty of its language. Though archaic, it is still in wide use.
This category will offer reviews, evaluations, and comparisons of Bible translations.
The English Standard Version (ESV) was published in 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a division of Good News Publishers. The ESV seeks to be a word-for-word translation rather than a thought-for-thought translation. The translation board used the Revised Standard Version (RSV) as a textual starting point for language and literary style although with the conscious decision to correct what many Evangelicals considered to be under-translations found in the RSV, that is, specific verses thought to be influenced by Liberal theology. In 2007 a revised edition appeared, in which about 360 changes were incorporated. In 2008 a Study Bible edition was released adding larger book introductions, copious study notes, topical articles, and concordance. The Bible text was the 2007 edition.
This category is for sites which describe the translation process and different translation philosophies and approaches, such as dynamic (functional) equivalence and formal (verbal) equivalence.
Since its completion in 1971, the New American Standard Bible has been widely acclaimed as “the most literally accurate translation” from the original languages. This version is considered to be the most literal translation of the Bible in the English language, consistently following the oldest and best manuscripts. It has been further revised and updated in a new 1995 translation.
The New English Translation (NET) Bible was conceived in November 1995. NET has a double meaning, standing both for New English Translation and for the Internet, since it is available for free on the Internet. The final version was completed in 2005. This Evangelical version features translator footnotes to assist the reader in understanding the decisions made when rendering the original languages into English.
New English Translation of the Septuagint
The New English Translation of the Septuagint (NETS) is a translation of the Septuagint into modern English. The copyright is held by the International Organization for Septuagint and Cognate Studies (IOSCS) and the publisher is Oxford University Press. What is the Septuagint? The Orthodox Church accepts the Septuagint, an ancient translation of the Old Testament from Hebrew into Greek, as their official version of the Old Testament. The Septuagint is an early Koine Greek translation of the Hebrew Old Testament produced in the third century B.C. by Jews in Alexandria. This translation of the Hebrew Bible was widely used by Jews in the time of Jesus and by the early Christian church. The Septuagint in commonly abbreviated as LXX, referring to the group of 70 translators. Note that other Christian Bible translations use primarily the Masoretic Hebrew text of the Old Testament. Variant readings from the Septuagint are sometimes mentioned in the footnotes, but not typically adopted in the main text.
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Sites which oppose all translations of the Bible, its claim of truth, or the Christian viewpoint of it, should be submitted to Society/Religion_and_Spirituality/Opposing_Views/Christianity/Bible/.

The New International Version (NIV) is a translation published by the International Bible Society. It had its start in 1965 and is the result of a cooperation between scholars of many denominations including Anglican, Baptist, Christian Reformed, Church of Christ, Lutheran, Methodist, Presbyterian, and other churches.
The New King James Version (NKJV) is a revision of the Authorized Version (AV)-- popularly called the King James Version (KJV). The NKJV New Testament usually retains the so-called Majority Text or Textus Receptus while updating archaic terminology. The New Testament was published in 1979 and the Old Testament in 1982. A minor revision was issued in 1984.
Published in 1996 by Tyndale House Publishers. Translators were charged with revising the popular Living Bible Paraphrase, but with accuracy of a new translation. The result is a translation where the emphasis is on readability and dynamic equivalence which translates thoughts rather than individual words. A second-generation revision aimed at increasing precision was released in 2004. An additional minor revision was issued in 2007.
The NRSV first appeared in 1989 and has received the widest acclaim and broadest support from academics and church leaders of any modern English translation. It is the only Bible translation that is as widely ecumenical.
Please submit only sites about this specific translation here. Both "pro" and "con" site are acceptable.
The Orthodox Study Bible (OSB) uses the New King James Version (NKJV) for both the Old and New Testaments with the following caveats: The New Testament follows the NKJV text exactly. The Old Testament is revised to follow the Septuagint only when it varies from the NKJV Old Testament. Additionally, since the Septuagint includes the Apocrypha or Deutero-canonical books of the Old Testament, these are newly translated into English for the OSB because these books are not in the NKJV. This is the first English translation of the Septuagint (commonly abbreviated as LXX) since Lancelot Brenton's translation of 1851. The study features of this version include book introductions, study notes, and topical articles written from an Orthodox Church perspective and annotations which include commentary from Patristic literature, that is, early Christian writers discussing the meaning of various passages. 1993 Edition: An edition which included the New Testament and Psalms was released in April 1993 by Thomas Nelson, Inc. (Nelsonword Publishing Group). 2008 Edition: The full edition including the complete Old and New Testament was released in June 2008 by Thomas Nelson, Inc. What is the Septuagint? The Orthodox Church accepts the Septuagint, an ancient translation of the Old Testament from Hebrew into Greek, as their official version of the Old Testament. The Septuagint is an early Koine Greek translation of the Hebrew Old Testament produced in the third century B.C. by Jews in Alexandria. This translation of the Hebrew Bible was widely used by Jews in the time of Jesus and by the early Christian church. The Septuagint in commonly abbreviated as LXX, referring to the group of 70 translators. Note that other Christian Bible translations use primarily the Masoretic Hebrew text of the Old Testament. Variant readings from the Septuagint are sometimes mentioned in the footnotes, but not typically adopted in the main text.
Articles about, and text of, the Revised Standard Version and New Revised Standard Version of the Bible. The Revised Standard Version of the Bible (RSV) was published in 1952 under the auspices of what was then the (US) National Council of Church's Division of Christian Education. The New Revised Standard Version of the Bible (NRSV) is copyright 1989, and is considered the most ecumenical Bible translation.
A thought-for-thought translation or paraphrase of the Bible into modern English by Eugene Peterson. The New Testament was completed in 1993 followed by the Old Testament in 2002.
This category is for websites discussing any aspect of the controversial "gender-neutral" revision of the New International Version.
The World English Bible (WEB) is a Public Domain (no copyright) modern English translation of the Holy Bible. It is based on the American Standard Version of the Holy Bible first published in 1901, the Biblia Hebraica Stutgartensa Old Testament, and the Greek Majority Text New Testament. It is in draft form, and currently being edited for accuracy and readability.
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Last update: Friday, February 21, 2014 8:15:11 AM EST - edit