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Sites which merely express consumer complaints should by submitted to Home/Consumer_Information/Companies instead.

Protests, boycotts, strikes, class action suits, and other organized actions against corporations is the type of site that goes in here.

Protests, boycotts, strikes, class action suits, and other organized actions against corporations.
This category consists of persons and entities campaigning against one or many forms of media or media figure-heads.
Sites covering this type of demonstration and about the historic events of the 19th and 20th December in Argentina and the related protests.
The night of the 19th and 20th December 2001 in Argentina a new type of demonstration that eventually led to the resignation of President Fernando de La RĂșa was born. It consisted of thousands of people banging on their caceroles (pots and pans), hence the term of the Spanish word 'cacerolazo' for this type of demonstration. Later more 'cacerolazos' were used in different parts of the world as means of protest, sometimes in the context of the anti-globalisation movement.
Sites dealing with the physical structures of a community, including construction of infrastructure and housing, as well as environmental sustainability, do not belong in this category. Please check the related categories listed below, as well as local business and economy categories, for a more appropriate place to suggest the site.

Sites which focus on desired outcomes (safer neighborhoods, healthier children and families, better-preserved cultural traditions, more profitable businesses, and so forth), rather than on the goal or process of community building, should not be suggested here. Please suggest them under their issue area or location.

Neighborhood, homeowner, and tenant associations, as well as real estate developments, should be suggested in Regional under their locality.

Community building has come to refer to a variety of intentional efforts to (a) organize and strengthen social connections or (b) build common values that promote collective goals. Literally, community building means building more community (an interim goal) as a way of achieving some set of desired outcomes (safer neighborhoods, healthier children and families, better-preserved cultural traditions, more profitable businesses, and so forth). While specific meanings vary widely depending on context, community building emphasizes the beneficial aspects of key processes (actions) that shape relationships, values, psychological attachment, and other aspects of community. As such, community building bears important connections to community organizing and community development." (Xavier de Souza Briggs) This category is for groups which directly build community and for groups which enable community building and maintenance, through actions such as providing grants or feedback. It also includes sites which discuss, criticize, or study "community".
Consumer Activism is citizen action aimed at influencing corporate decisions, corporate power, and public policy as it relates to consumers and corporate operations.
Please submit only sites dealing with issues, concerns, topics that are part of Society category and that involve activism that is more than an annual or periodic act, that is, more or less does occur or could occur in daily life.
Web sites that describe, challenge or present "how to's" for activism in daily life are welcome here.
Submission Tips:
  1. When writing your site''s title please ensure it is the same as your organization.
  2. When writing your site''s description, please tell what your site offers in a clear and concise statement without hype or promotional language.
Thank-you for your cooperation.
This category is for two kinds of sites. The first are sites that utilize media to promote grassroots social activism. The second are the ones that protest specific media sources. There is a fine line between having a site that criticizes a specific source and one that promotes activism in opposition to it. However, if your site is more of a critical examination of a media source (or sources) than an activist one, it should be submitted to Media: Analysis and Opinion. In addition, if your site is more oriented towards educating the public in how to consume the media in general, it should be submitted to Media Literacy. Also, if your site promotes the "public interest" generally, and is not tied to any specific issue, it may belong here. It also should also be submitted to Media: Public Interest.
Taking action such as organizing, volunteering, protesting, and petitioning to help solve a wide variety of social issues.
Please submit only sites that deal with the use of nonviolence as a technique for social or political change.
In this category, the term nonviolence refers to the theory and practice of making social or political change using methods that exclude violence, and should not to be confused with anti-violence, crime prevention or pacifism.
This category is only for general petition sites written in English.

Individual petitions or thematic directories of petitions should be suggested under their topic or geographic region. (If you don''t see a category listed here for the issue, check under Society/Issues. Petitions relating to TV programming, musical styles of bands, etc. should be suggested to a subcategory of Arts.)

This category includes general directories of online petitions, as well as tools and services to create and manage online and paper petitions. This includes sites which allow the creation of online petitions, software tools or modules for hosting your own petitions, tips and models for writing petitions, and services to analyze and deliver petition results.
Activism by country and by region.

Tools and resources to support activists, as opposed to sites which are about activism itself.

Activism strategies.
Video Activism and political activism videos in general.
Global protest events against those who caused the current economic problems. It started with Occupy Wall Street.

A leaderless resistance movement with people of many colors, genders and political persuasions. The one thing they all have in common is that

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Last update: Wednesday, July 31, 2013 12:35:49 AM EDT - edit