Websites concerned with water resources in the country, including rainwater, groundwater, rivers, and coastal areas.
This category leads to websites about canals in the British Isles, originally built as a form of Transport at the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, to serve as a Water Resource for emerging Technology.
At the time Canals would have been regarded as Technology, undertaken by Civil Engineers, to control water, from a source higher than the level of the Canal, so that canal boats could be lifted at locks, by trapping water escaping by gravity, until sufficient water was collected in the water to be level with the canal above, then progress along level water until the next lock.
With the advent of the Railways, some canal construction was never completed, such as with the plans to join the mouth of the Severn with the English Channel, The Grand Western Canal.
Railways were largely superseded by road transport, as the most convenient means of transporting goods, and many canals were culverted rather than constructing road bridges under which canal traffic could continue.
In both these cases the non-navigable canal became a Water Resource for Course Fishing, and local recreation such as canoeing.
Neglected canals, became a Water Resource for Wildlife, and because of their towpaths, canals provided recreational Water Resources, such as Walking and Cycling.
In some cases the canal locks and technological heritage provide a tourist attraction, most notable the World Heritage Site of Pontcysyllte Aqueduct, on the Langollen Canal.
Although the industrial significance of British canals had its hay day, during the latter part of the nineteenth century the heritage canals were recognised locally as a Water Resource for Tourism, particularly recreational narrow boats, and many culverted sections were reopened by providing bridges under which narrow boats could pass, such as The Rochdale Leeds Canal over the Pennines.
Sites listed here should contain scientific information about Canals as a Water Resource, whether the Technology behind their construction for the Industrial Revolution, providing an Ecological Niche for wildlife, or resource for future technology such as hydro electric power.
This category may contain subcategories about a specific canal where sufficient websites justify this,whereas some categories have already been created recognising the Recreational or Tourism aspects, and have been linked from here.

In order to qualify for listing in this category, websites must contain some scientific content, which should be
included in the suggested description.  If science is not the primary content of the site, please consider
suggesting it to the most appropriate category.  This may be found by following links in the  Coarse Fishing or  Marinas category instead.
Otherwise please consider the  Locality category instead.

This category is for websites specifically about tidal waters off the coast of the United Kingdom of Great Britain, and Northern Ireland.
For recreational use of marine waters, please see  UK: Recreation . . .Water_Sports
and for related businesses:
  UK: Business and Economy: Marine Sales and_Services.

This category is for geographical websites devoted to inland streams and rivers, down to their estuaries to the British coast.
ie. for non-tidal rivers, or those that do not have an Estuary category under  Marine.

In order to qualify for listing in this category, websites must contain some scientific content, which should be
included in the suggested description.  If science is not the primary content of the site, please consider
suggesting it to the most appropriate.  This may be found by following links in the  Game Fishing or  Canoeing and Kayaking category instead.
Otherwise please consider the  Locality category instead.