This section is devoted to soaring, the flying of aircraft without relying on engines. The web sites here will help you find governing bodies for soaring, locations where you can soar, sailplane manufacturers, weather information, and other information related to soaring.
Sites primarily concerned with sales and service, repair, trading, or chartering of gliders. Excluded are large sites with strong general interest.
Please ensure that if you submit your club site, and the web site is hosted on a student account, that you ensure the account does not expire at the end of the academic year. Thankyou.
Sites primarily concerned with sales and service, repair, trading, or chartering of gliders. Excluded are large sites with strong general interest.
Sites primarily concerned with sales and service, repair, trading, or chartering of gliders. Excluded are large sites with strong general interest.
Sites about the competitive aspect of soaring - performance, lift to drag ratio, tactics and speed opitimization are some topics.
To soar is to fly in a glider. A glider is defined as a flying craft design to use upward air currents (thermals) in the atmosphere to gain and maintain altitude.
This category contains portals, link sources and databases about soaring.
Sites about the history of soaring.
Sites featuring pictures, photos and videos about soaring or glider flying.
Collection of web pages about an individual or group and their interests.
Software for managing glider flight logs, planning, analysis, and viewers for playback of flight recordings
Software for managing glider flight logs, planning, analysis, and viewers for playback of flight recordings
Ground schools, explanations of the dynamics of the air currents, and historical aspects of gliding.
Ground schools, explanations of the dynamics of the air currents, and historical aspects of gliding.
This category is about wave soaring.
Leewaves (mountain waves) are atmospheric internal gravity waves and were discovered 1933 by German glider pilots above the Riesengebirge. Wind driven air parcels hitting a mountainlike obstacle are being deflected upwards and will, in a stably stratified atmosphere, return to their initial height setting up an oscillatory up-down motion. Such a wave system, which often exhibits typical phenomena as interference and wave breaking, is frequently made visible by stationary, lense shaped clouds, socalled lenicularis (text by mountainwave project).