Squeak was all Smalltalk-80 when new, in 1996. It is still mostly an implementation of modified Smalltalk-80, but in some ways it is a somewhat different language, no longer an orthodox Smalltalk, and it is changing and evolving. In its first several years: 1) The code base was almost fully rewritten, parts of it several times. 2) Squeak's leaders have ceased work on the standard Smalltalk user interface, Model-View-Controller (MVC), which is used in other Smalltalks, and Java, and have moved to the Self language's display tree-based Morphic User Interface, which they are developing beyond what it was in Self. Squeak's leaders will work no more in or on MVC, but only in and on Morphic, or something better. So, Squeak's interface is now far more like Self than like normal Smalltalk. And Morphic is driving other, deeper changes in Squeak. 3) On Squeak's mail list, discussion occurs on how to create a new language model, to go beyond object orientation, and how to move Squeak to it. Some people want to experiment with prototype language features as in Self. And, Alan Kay himself says that using the term "objects" in the 1970s was an error. He says the REBOL language has some very good ideas. The new language model may focus on messaging instead of objects. New syntax and control structures will be added, some of which may replace long standing Smalltalk norms. These are big changes. 4) Squeak now has many standard features that no other Smalltalk has: two User Interface systems (Morphic, MVC), experimental handwriting recognition, MIDI and realtime high quality sound synthesis, Web browser, IRC client, Swiki, email client, Web server, several demos and games, two full VMs written in Squeak (a full Smalltalk-80 VM and a JIT compiler VM), means to output C source code directly from a VM and run a VM as a simulation atop itself, a full set of ST-80 classes, automated Internet-based updating, and e-toys. More is coming in the future.
To this category, please submit links for the Smalltalk variant called Squeak only. Submit other Smalltalk links to their suitable categories.
This category holds links for books, paper or online, on the Squeak dialect of the Smalltalk programming language, and very closely related issues.
This category holds links for books, paper or online, on the Squeak dialect of the Smalltalk programming language, and very closely related issues.
Croquet is an open source software platform to develop and deliver deeply collaborative multiuser online programs. It has a network architecture supporting communication, collaboration, resource sharing, and synchronous computation among users. It provides a flexible framework in which most user interface concepts can be prototyped and deployed to create powerful, collaborative multiuser 2D and 3D programs and simulations. It can be used to make scalable collaborative data visualizations, virtual learning and problem solving environments, 3D wikis, online gaming environments (MMORPGs), and privately maintained and interconnected multiuser virtual environments.
This category is for FAQs, help and tip files and documents, tutorials, and closely related documents and websites for the Squeak dialect of the Smalltalk programming language.
Scratch is an interpreted dynamic visual programming language, based on Squeak. Being dynamic lets code be changed even as programs are running. It goal is to teach programming concepts to children and let them create games, videos, and music. It can be downloaded for free and is being used in a wide variety of in-school and after-school settings around the world. The name refers to the technique, developed in, and still common in, hip hop (rap) music, of a turntablist moving a vinyl record back and forth to make sounds, and refers to both the language and its implementation. It is being developed by a small team of researchers in the Lifelong Kindergarten Group at the MIT Media Lab.
This category is for software written in Squeak (Squeak code), or software written to work intimately with Squeak systems and/or code.
To this category please submit only links to software written in Squeak (Squeak code), or software written to work intimately with Squeak systems and/or code.