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Please add sites in English that comply with the Category Description only. Sites written in other languages should be submitted to an appropriate category of the World branch instead. Sites that are meant for users in a particular region belong to the Regional branch. If they appeal to global users but correspond to a region, we recommend you submit them to both this and a regional category. For resource sites, please use the parent category: Business/Investing/Funds/ETFs_and_CEFs/ .
This category lists individual closed-end funds and CEF families. Closed-end (or "close-end") funds (CEFs) are distinguished from open-end funds (eg., mutual funds and exchange-traded funds) because they don't increase available shares as investment dollars received by the fund come in. Moreover, with open-ended funds, the quantity of shares decreases when investors withdraw money by selling shares. This is the basis of some investors preferring certain, specific kinds of well managed closed end funds. Its manager has the freedom to avoid selling illiquid, slowly traded shares they hold and further protects the closed end from massive "all at once" liquidations. However, buyers must learn the ropes, because being closed end in no way assures the quality of the managers or the investment potential of the fund. Another major difference between CEFs and mutual funds, is that the shares of the former are traded in stock exchanges, as if they were ordinary company stock.
Please add sites in English that comply with the Category Description only. Sites written in other languages should be submitted to an appropriate category of the World branch instead. Sites that are meant for users in a particular region belong to the Regional branch. If they appeal to global users but correspond to a region, we recommend you submit them to both this and a regional category. For resource sites, please use the parent category: Business/Investing/Funds/ETFs_and_CEFs/ .
This category lists individual exchange-traded funds (ETFs) and ETF families. Exchange Traded Funds (ETFs) are open-end funds that trade in real-time in stock exchanges, like if they were ordinary company stock. They combine some of the advantages of stocks with those of mutual funds. ETFs are generally based on tax-efficient indices, and are therefore good choices for passive, buy-and-hold investment strategies. Unlike stocks, which cannot be shorted on a 'down-tick', they can be shorted on a down-tick. Moreover, unlike mutual funds, ETFs can have stop and/or limit orders.
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Last update: Saturday, May 24, 2008 3:02:36 AM EDT - edit