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Submit to this category sites that are wholly or predominantly devoted to the ballad. Sites that contain a few ballads among other poems should be submitted to one of the less specialized categories, such as "Fixed Verse Forms," "Poetic Forms," or "Poetry."
A narrative poem often set to music, commonly with four-line stanzas rhyming abab or abcb with lines 1 and 3 in tetrameter and lines 2 and 4 in trimeter. The form was popular in the British Isles in the medieval period and later spread to North America and Australia. Some non-narrative poems are also written in traditional ballad stanzas, and some later ballads extended the traditional stanza to six lines.
Submit to this category sites that are wholly or predominantly devoted to the ballade. Sites that contain a few ballades among other poems should be submitted to one of the less specialized categories, such as "Fixed Verse Forms," "Poetic Forms," or "Poetry."
A form (not to be confused with the ballad) that originated in France in the 14th and 15th centuries, usually consisting of three eight-line stanzas followed by a four-line envoi. The last line of each stanza and the envoi is a refrain. The rhyme scheme is ababbcbC repeated three times, and then bcbC, with the capital letter being the refrain.
Submit to this category sites that are wholly or predominantly devoted to the cinquain. Sites that contain a few cinquains among other poems should be submitted to one of the less specialized categories, such as "Fixed Verse Forms," "Poetic Forms," or "Poetry."
SO WHAT'S A CINQUAIN? Pronounced (sing-KANE). Technically, any five-line poem or stanza is a cinquain, the latter, sometimes referred to as a quintet. AMERICAN CINQUAIN -- The most common form is a counted syllabic poem of five lines of free verse: two, four, six, eight, two syllables each, and is generally in iambic foot. It was developed in the early 20th Century by the American poet, Adelaide Crapsey (1878-1914), whose brief cinquain series was published posthumously in her book titled "Verse"(Rochester, NY: Manas Press,1915). It is derived from the Japanese haiku and tanka traditions, which were modified by Crapsey to fit polysyllabic English-language verse. DIDACTIC CINQUAIN There is another form of cinquain which is typically used to teach young children the rudiments of line and meter: line 1: one word names the subject; line 2: two words describe the subject; line 3: three words relate what it is doing; line 4: four words tell how you feel about it; line 5: one word renames the subject. This is generally used as a didactic device in elementary schools. --Billie Dee
Submit to this category sites that are wholly or predominantly devoted to the clerihew. Sites that contain a few clerihews among other poems should be submitted to one of the less specialized categories, such as "Fixed Verse Forms," "Poetic Forms," or "Poetry."
The clerihew consists of two non-metrical couplets. The lines can be of uneven length, usually short, although the fourth line is often longer than the others. Clerihews are biographical, with the name of the subject often ending the first line. The form was invented by Edmund Clerihew Bentley (hence the name), with some help from G.K. Chesterton.
Submit to this category sites that are wholly or predominantly devoted to the kyrielle. Sites that contain a few kyrielles among other poems should be submitted to one of the less specialized categories, such as "Fixed Verse Forms," "Poetic Forms," or "Poetry."
A French form of the early Renaissance named after the "Kyrie Elieson" of the Catholic mass. It consists of tetrameter couplets usually joined into quatrains, with the last line (or a portion of the last line) of the first quatrain repeated as a refrain. Thus the rhyme scheme would be: aabB ccbB ddbB, etc. There are, however, numerous variations, such as abaB cbcB, etc., or acaB adaB, etc. This is a form often used for writing hymns.
Submit to this category sites that are wholly or predominantly devoted to the limerick. Sites that contain a few limericks among other poems should be submitted to one of the less specialized categories, such as "Fixed Verse Forms," "Poetic Forms," or "Poetry."
The limerick consists of five anapestic lines rhymed aabba. The first, second, and fifth lines are trimeter; the third and fourth lines are dimeter. The form dates back at least to the fourteenth century. In its modern form, it is often, though not always, bawdy.
Submit to this category sites that are wholly or predominantly devoted to the pantoum. Sites that contain a few pantoums among other poems should be submitted to one of the less specialized categories, such as "Fixed Verse Forms," "Poetic Forms," or "Poetry."
The pantoum is a poetic form derived from the Malaysian pantun. In its modern form, the pantoum consists of an optional number of four-line stanzas, often unrhymed, in which the second and fourth lines of each stanza become the first and third lines of the following stanza. In more ambitious pantoums, the third and first lines of the first stanza become the second and fourth lines of the last stanza, so that the last line of the poem is identical to the first line of the poem. Some pantoums repeat only the first line of the first stanza in the last stanza.
Submit to this category sites that are wholly or predominantly devoted to the rondeau, rondel, and/or rondelet. Sites that contain a few such poems among other poems should be submitted to one of the less specialized categories, such as "Fixed Verse Forms," "Poetic Forms," or "Poetry."
Related French lyric forms of the late Middle Ages. The rondeau consists of three stanzas: five lines, four lines, and six lines. The second and third stanzas end with a refrain taken from the beginning of the first line of the poem. The rhyme scheme is: aabba aabR aabbaR, with "R" standing for the refrain. In the rondel the first two lines of the first stanza are repeated as the last two lines of the second and third stanza. The rhyme scheme is: abba abab abbaab. The rondelet consists of one seven-line stanza, in which a short first line is repeated as the third and seventh line of the poem. The rhyme scheme is: abaabba.
Submit to this category sites that are wholly or predominantly devoted to the sestina. Sites that contain a few sestinas among other poems should be submitted to one of the less specialized categories, such as "Fixed Verse Forms," "Poetic Forms," or "Poetry."
The sestina is a medieval provencal poetic form attributed to the troubadour Arnaut Daniel. It consists of six six-line stanzas, ending with a three-line envoi. The six words that end the lines of the first stanza are repeated as the end words of each of the other stanzas in a complex pattern that goes like this (note that each letter corresponds to an end word, not an end rhyme): abcdef, faebdc, cfdabe, ecbfad, deacfb, bdfeca. Each line of the three-line envoi must end with one of the end words but also must contain within it one of the other end words. There are several possible patterns for the envoi, but the most common are ace or eca for the end words and bdf or fdb for the middle words. Since the same words are repeated throughout the poem, the sestina is an excellent vehicle for meditation on complex and multiple meanings.
Submit to this category sites that are wholly or predominantly devoted to the sevenling. Sites that contain a few sevenlings among other poems should be submitted to one of the less specialized categories, such as "Fixed Verse Forms," "Poetic Forms," or "Poetry."
A poem of seven lines inspired by a poem by Anna Akhmatova. The first three lines contain three elements (names, objects, etc.), the second three lines another three elements, and the last line some sort of denouement. Although no meter or rhyme scheme is specified, the poem is normally divided into two three-line stanzas and a solitary seventh line.
Submit to this category sites that are wholly or predominantly devoted to the sonnet. Sites that contain a few sonnets among other poems should be submitted to one of the less specialized categories, such as "Fixed Verse Forms," "Poetic Forms," or "Poetry."
The sonnet, attributed to Petrarch in the early Italian renaissance, is a fourteen-line poem that in its original form had the rhyme scheme abba abba cdecde. It was later adapted in England by Wyatt and Surrey with the rhyme scheme abab cdcd efef gg. This later form is sometimes called the English sonnet (the earlier one being the Italian sonnet). However, since Shakespeare used the English form, it is also often referred to as the Shakespearean sonnet. Both types of sonnets are written in iambic pentameter.
Submit to this category sites that are wholly or predominantly devoted to the terzanelle. Sites that contain a few terzanelles among other poems should be submitted to one of the less specialized categories, such as "Fixed Verse Forms," "Poetic Forms," or "Poetry."
A hybrid of the villanelle and terza rima in which the middle line of one tercet becomes the last line of the next tercet. Like the villanelle it consists of five tercets and a final quatrain, which can consist of either two couplets or alternating rhymes and repeats the first line of the poem as well as the second line of the previous tercet. Schematically, the form looks like this (with repeated lines in caps): aba bcB cdC deD efE fAFa or fFaA.
Submit to this category sites that are wholly or predominantly devoted to terza rima. Sites that contain a few poems using terza rima among other poems that do not should be submitted to one of the less specialized categories, such as "Fixed Verse Forms," "Poetic Forms," or "Poetry."
A verse form of Italian origin, perhaps invented by Dante, consisting of three-line stanzas (tercets) in which the middle line of one tercet rhymes with the first and third lines of the following tercet. The rhyme scheme looks like this: aba bcb cdc, etc. A poem in terza rima can be of any length and in any meter. The final stanza of the poem can be a single line, a couplet, or a tercet, but it must rhyme with the middle line of the previous stanza. A "Terza Rima Sonnet" is a poem consisting of four tercets and a couplet in terza rima form.
Submit to this category sites that are wholly or predominantly devoted to the triolet. Sites that contain a few triolets among other poems should be submitted to one of the less specialized categories, such as "Fixed Verse Forms," "Poetic Forms," or "Poetry."
A French lyric form of the late Middle Ages. The triolet consists of eight lines, with the first line repeated as the fourth and seventh line and the second line repeated as the eighth line. The rhyme scheme looks like this (with repeated lines as capital letters): ABaAabAB.
Submit to this category sites that are wholly or predominantly devoted to the villanelle. Sites that contain a few villanelles among other poems should be submitted to one of the less specialized categories, such as "Fixed Verse Forms," "Poetic Forms," or "Poetry."
The villanelle is a French poetic form consisting of five three-line verses and a sixth four-line verse. The first and third lines of the first verse are repeated alternately as the last line of the next four verses and then placed together as the ending couplet of the last verse. In addition, the five three-line verses all rhyme aba, with the last verse rhyming abaa. Thus there are only two rhymes in the entire poem. In most villanelles the repetition is light and graceful, but in some, including the most famous one, Dylan Thomas' "Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night," the repetition is used to express powerful emotion.
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Last update: Wednesday, August 14, 2013 1:58:43 AM EDT - edit