Covenant theology is a product of the 16th-17th century Reformation. Early leaders such as Johann Heinrich (Henry) Bullinger (1504-1575), Kasper Olevianus (1536-1587), Johannes Wollebius (1586-1629), William Ames (1576-1633), Johannes Cocceius (1603-1669), and Hermann Witsius (1636-1708) were instrumental in developing the Covenant view and incorporating it into various creedal confessions. These include the First (1636) and Second (1566) Helvetic Confessions, the Heidelberg Catechism (1563), the Thirty-nine Articles (1571), and the landmark, Westminster Confession of Faith (1647). Covenant theology is a system of interpreting the Scriptures on the basis of two covenants: the covenant of works and the covenant of grace. Some covenant theologians specify three covenants: works, redemption, and grace. Covenant theology teaches that God initially made a covenant of works with Adam, promising eternal life for obedience and death for disobedience. Adam failed, and death entered the human race. God, however, moved to resolve man's dilemma by entering into a covenant of grace through which the problem of sin and death would be overcome. Christ is the ultimate mediator of God's covenant of grace
Covenant Theology
An analysis of the covenants of grace, works and redemption.
Covenant Theology under Attack
Article by Meredith Kline.
FORUM: On The Covenant
Links to a number of articles on covenant theology.
Heinrich Bullinger, the First Covenant Theologian
An article which draws on the writings of Bullinger to show his thoughts on the doctrine of the covenant.
PressieChurch.org
Articles and essays on covenant theology.
Works in the Mosaic Covenant
A survey of major covenant theologians, such as Turretin, Owen and Witsius. [PDF]
Last update:
March 13, 2014 at 23:24:23 UTC
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