Society History By Topic Social History Labor Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire
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Still the worst factory fire in New York City history, the Triangle fire broke out shortly after 4:30 p.m. on March 25, 1911 in the cutting room on the eighth floor. The sweatshop employed over five hundred mostly Jewish immigrant women, and the owners had locked the doors to keep the workers at their sewing machines. A total of 146 died from fire, asphyxiation, trampling, and the collapse of the rear fire escape. Outcry over the fire and newly publicized working conditions led to several reforms, including granting the fire department authority to enforce stricter factory codes, and the creation of unions for workers in the garment district.

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The Triangle Factory Fire
Online exhibit of the Kheel Center at Cornell University covering the store of the fire and labor activism, mourning and relief work, and the following investigation and reform. Includes documents, audio, photographs, and illustrations as well as list of victims and witnesses, bibliography, and related links.
Triangle Shirtwaist Company Fire
Links to several accounts, historical records and photographs, and period information provided by the Lower Hudson Regional Information Center.
NPR: Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire
Streaming RealAudio of an interview with Dana Walden, granddaughter of Rose Freedman, the last living survivor of the fire. (March 25, 2001)
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Last update:
January 25, 2015 at 6:54:03 UTC
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