Although one of Lincoln's shortest speeches, the Gettysburg Address may be his most famous. The July 1-3, 1863 Battle of Gettysburg, near the town of the same name in southern Pennsylvania, is commonly identified as the turning point in the U.S. Civil War. Union General George Meade successfully repelled Confederate General Robert E. Lee's incursion into the north, but at the cost of over 51,000 lives. The consecration of a battlefield cemetery for Union soldiers on November 19, 1863 gave Lincoln occasion to recall the founding ideals of the republic, and to reinforce in the public mind an understanding of the war as a moral as well as political cause.

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The Gettysburg Address
Online exhibit which includes pictures, drafts and the full text of the Gettysburg Address in english and in twenty-eight other languages. From the Library of Congress.
The Gettysburg Address: Drafts
"Of the five known manuscript copies of the Gettysburg Address, the Library of Congress has two". You can see them online at this page.
Lost and Found Sound: Gettysburg Eyewitness
William Rathvon was only nine years old when he watched and listened to Abraham Lincoln deliver the famous Gettysburg address. Decades later, he recorded his memories of that occasion on a 78 rpm record. That sound file is reproduced here in RealAudio format.
Last update:
January 2, 2007 at 16:47:07 UTC
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