The Synapsids, or mammal-like reptiles, were the dominant land animals of the late Palaeozoic and early Triassic. They include mammals and their ancestors, the pelycosaurs, therapsids and cynodonts. They are distinguished by the position of temporal openings in the skull behind the eyes which provides an anchor for jaw muscles, resulting in stronger jaws.
Ask a Biologist Q&A: Synapsid Skin
Forum thread discussing where the non-mammalian synapsids stand in the transition from reptilian scales to mammalian hair.
Dicynodontia
Illustration and information on the characters and anatomy, major subgroups, fossil record and evolution of these herbivores.
Dinocephalia
Illustration and information on the characters and anatomy, major subgroups, fossil record and evolution of these carnivorous therapsids.
Fossil Groups: Diapsids
Provides information on this group of amniotes, their characters and anatomy, major subgroups, fossil record, modern forms, literature and weblinks.
Fossil Groups: Synapsida
Provides information on the characteristics and anatomy of synapsids with a diagram of a typical early period skull showing the synapsid arch and undifferentiated teeth.
Introduction to the Synapsida
Information on this great vertebrate group with a 300 million year history, their fossil record, life history, ecology, systematics and morphology.
Synapsid
Information from Wikipedia on this group of reptiles, their changing classification, characteristics and evolutionary history.
Synapsida: Mammals and Their Extinct Relatives
Information from the Tree of Life Web Project on the synapsids which include mammals and all extinct amniotes more closely related to mammals than to reptiles.
[Dinozilla]
Last update:
August 29, 2015 at 1:43:17 UTC
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