Trace fossils, or ichnofossils, are the preserved evidence of animals activity found in the rock record. They range from dinosaur footprints to worm burrows to root traces. This category is for any website dealing with the study of trace fossils.

Subcategories 1

Introduction to Ichnology
Anthony J. Martin's extensive and comprehensive website about plant and animal trace fossils. Includes information on all aspects of studying traces fossils, the Ichnology Newsletter, Trace Fossil Image Database, a trace fossil bibliography, and links to related websites.
Dinosaur Tracks and Ichnology
Provides a number of resources on trace fossils which are any marks, or other evidence, left behind by an animal while it was still alive.
Ichnology
The study of tracks, trails, footprints and other animal traces. Photographs of a number of modern, archaeological and paleontological traces.
Ichnology Research Group
A multidisciplinary team of graduate and postgraduate researchers at the University of Alberta led by Professor S. George Pemberton working on trace fossil problems.
Ichnology: The Study of Tracks and Traces
Ewan Wolff of the Montana State University Geoscience Education Web Development Team, provides links to a number of resources on traces, tracks and trackways.
The Paluxy Dinosaur/Human Footprint Controversy
Discusses the history and origin of controversial fossil tracks at Glen Rose, Texas, and related matters, including the study of dinosaur tracks and trace fossils in general.
Precambrian Fossils
Possible Precambrian trace fossils collected in the Van Horn region of Texas.
Sed-Trace
Information on applied sedimentology and ichnology provided by Jean Gerard. Includes a rock gallery and details of the book "Ichnofabrics in clastic sediments".
Virtual Ichnology Library
Provides an online library of the major contributions of early researchers in this field, mostly in pdf format and essentially facsimiles of the originals.
[Dinozilla]
Last update:
August 26, 2008 at 4:39:45 UTC
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