Members of the kingdom Myxomycota are the plasmodial or true slime moulds. The individuals group together to form patches of wet slime on fallen logs, with many nuclei in a continuous sheet of cytoplasm. The patches do not move bodily but may grow in one direction. When conditions become drier, they may form a mound from which stalked sporangia grow, and from which single-celled offspring emerge

Subcategories 6

Introduction to the 'Slime Molds'
Illustrated discussion of the biology and classification of these organisms, which are no longer considered to be fungi and which include three main groups that do not form a clade.
Mushroom Photo Gallery: Myxomycetes
About twenty photographs of various slime molds found in the United States.
Myxomycota
List of about 80 slime moulds, with photographs of each.
Philippine Myxomycetes and other Slime Molds
Dedicated to the species of Myxomycetes and other Eumycetozoans found in the Philippines, with illustrations of many species. The Eumycetozoan Research Project is managed by myxomycetologist Isidro T. Savillo.
Phylum Myxostelida
Pictorial outline of the slime molds.
Slime Molds
Student project by Brad Renner including classification, habitat, adaptation, nutrition, reproduction and interactions with other species.
Slime Mould
Information on slime moulds which were originally considered to be fungi by mycologists and amoebae by zoologists, respectively classified as Myxomycota (slime fungi) or Mycetozoa (fungus animals).
Slime Moulds
Illustrated introduction to slime mold biology.
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September 2, 2015 at 7:45:06 UTC
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