Members of the kingdom Chrysophyta are single-celled protists known as golden algae. They vary greatly, are very widespread and are mostly found in fresh, cool lakes and ponds, sometimes forming colonies which may be elaborately shaped. The marine types form intricate skeletons of silica.
Chrysophyta
Information from MicrobWiki on this phylum of unicellular marine or freshwater protists, members of which include the diatoms (class Bacillariophyta), golden algae (class Chrysophyceae), and yellow-green algae (class Xanthophyceae).
Desmid
Information from Wikipedia on this order of green algae which have a variety of symmetric shapes which provide a basis for their classification.
Desmids
Article by Wim van Egmond on these organisms with many excellent photographs of various species.
Diatom
Information on this unicellular organism of the kingdom Protista characterized by a silica shell of often intricate and beautiful sculpturing.
Golden Algae
Information from Wikipedia on this large group of unicellular flagellate algae, the Chrysophytes, found mostly in fresh water.
Introduction to the Chrysophyta
Brief discussion of the group, also called golden algae, which is found in fresh water, particularly lakes. Includes information on some subgroups.
Phylum Chrysophyta
Provides a list of all the species included in the orders Bacillariales, Biddulphiales, Coscinodiscales, Fragilariales and Rhizosoleniales.
Silicoflagellate
Information from Wikipedia on this small group of unicellular algae, found in marine environments. Members of the only genus, Dictyocha, have one golden-brown chloroplast and a long flagellum.
The Silicoflagellate Dictyocha
Photographic study by Rene van Wezel of this member of the marine phytoplankton.
Silicoflagellates
An illustrated article by Richard T Carter on these interesting protists.
Synura uvella
Image of this species which forms small colonies.
Vaucheria in Connecticut
Researchers at Trinity College have been investigating the mud-stabilizing yellow-green alga Vaucheria in freshwater wetlands and salt-marshes for several years. Links also to other Vaucheria research.
Last update:
February 23, 2016 at 6:15:07 UTC
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