The fungi are traditionally classified according to the micro-anatomy of their fruiting bodies, the familiar mushrooms and toadstools. However there are some species that are only known to reproduce asexually and so never form a fruiting body, making it difficult to classify them. These include about 25,000 species and are often given the group name Deuteromycota or the Fungi Imperfecti. Members of this group may be assigned to their proper place in the classification system when more information becomes available.
Beauveria bassiana
Photographs of a cicada and a beetle killed by this fungus.
Beauveria bassiana
Photographs and information on this species which is an aggressive parasite of insects, killing the flies it infects.
Cryphonectria parasitica
Article by Tom Volk on this fungus, a parasite which causes Chestnut Blight and which has devastated the chestnut trees of North America.
Deuteromycota
Information from Wikipedia on this group of anamorphic fungi, also known as Fungi imperfecti or mitosporic fungi, that are known only in an asexually reproducing form.
Epidermophyton floccosum
Article by Tom Volk on this fungus which is a frequent cause of the condition Athlete’s Foot.
Malassezia globosa
Photograph of this species which causes dandruff.
Malassezia Species
Description of this fungus which colonises skin, with information on its pathogenicity and clinical significance, and its macroscopic and microscopic features.
Paecilomyces
Information from Wikipedia on this fungus which can be used to kill harmful nematodes.
Profollias downhoki
Tom Volk provides photographs and information on this fungus, found growing in a kangaroo's pouch, which provides a missing link between fungi and plants.
Stachybotrys chartarum
Illustrated article by Tom Volk and Nik Zitomer on this deuteromycete mold which is believed to cause “sick building syndrome”.
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