A transit is the apparent passage of a solar system body other than the Moon across the face of the Sun. The only visible transits are those of Mercury and Venus.

Subcategories 1

The Next Transits of Venus
Brief description with diagrams of the 2004 and 2012 transits as seen from Guernsey.
Orpington Astronomical Society - Transit of Venus 2004
Description of the event, explanation of timing, illustrations including "black drop effect".
Transit of Mercury Live images
Webcam announcement from Worth Hill Observatory in the UK.
Transit of Venus, 2004
A table showing predicted time and path of the transit for various locations throughout the world. From the US Naval Observatory. [PDF]
The Venus Transit
Contains a number of pages dedicated to the 2012 Venus transit. Practical information regarding the location and observation methods and safety together with articles about past transits.
Venus Transit 2004
Describes the VT-2004 project that is related to this celestial event and which aims at transforming curiosity into knowledge and interest in science through a broad set of actions. It has been launched by the European Southern Observatory (ESO) and the European Association for Astronomy Education (EAAE), together with the Institut de Mécanique Céleste et de Calcul des Éphémérides (IMCCE) and the Observatoire de Paris in France, as well as the Astronomical Institute of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic.
Your Planetary Transits
Windows software to calculate the exact dates and times at which transits between two selected planets (including the Sun) begin and end (relative to chosen orb values).
Telescopes Aim at Mercury
BBC News article anticipating the 2003 transit. (May 02, 2003)
[Space Mozilla]
Last update:
February 12, 2015 at 6:15:04 UTC
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