The Japanese Tea Ceremony ("chanoyu" or "chado") developed during the Momoyama period (1570 - 1600 AD). The upper (and, later, upper-middle) class enjoyed formal tea parties held in small rooms ("chashitsu") specially designed for the occasion. There are many schools of tea art ("ryuuha") current in Japan: for example, Omotesenke, Urasenke, and Mushanokoujisenke.

The special tea ("matcha") used in the tea ceremony is made from tea leaves that have been ground into a green powder. The matcha is put into the cup first. Hot water is then added and the tea is mixed with a special utensil. The host serves the tea to the guests one at a time. Each guest tastes and appreciates the tea before the next guest is served.

Related categories 2

Nambu Ironware
Short history of metalwork in Nambu, where iron kettles for the tea ceremony are still made in the traditional way.
The Urasenke Konnichian Web Site
Short biographies of the successive masters of the tea school established by the great 16th century tea master, Rikyu.
Urasenke Tradition of Tea
Gives introduction and history of tea ceremony, and lineage of the Urasenke family and organization.
[Japanese Mozilla]
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June 11, 2015 at 13:54:04 UTC
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