Onchocerciasis, also known as river blindness, is caused by the nematode Onchocerca volvulus and can result in dermatitis, subcutaneous nodules, lymphadenitis, and visual impairment, including blindness. The disease is transmitted by the bite of female Simulium flies (black flies) that bite by day and are found near rapidly flowing rivers and streams. It affects over 17 million people in 25 nations in Africa.

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African Programme for Onchocerciasis Control
Detailed information about the disease and eradication programs from the World Health Organization.
BioMed Central: Onchocerciasis
Full text article on treatment aimed at eliminating the infection from Ecuador, including the use of Ivermectin as an oral microfilaricidal drug.
The Carter Center: River Blindness (Onchocerciasis) Program
Provides information on this disease and the program for its elimination being undertaken.
CDC Travelers' Health Information: Onchocerciasis (River Blindness)
Brief information from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
CDC: River Blindness
Factsheet and press releases concerning the disease.
eMedicine - Onchocerciasis
Article by Deborah Eezzuduemhoi, MD.
eMedicine - Onchocerciasis
Article by Michael A Forgione, Jr, MD.
Life-cycle of Onchocerca volvulus
Illustrated information on the parasites that cause onchocerciasis which are transmitted between humans through the bites of blackfly vectors.
TDR: Onchocerciasis
Provides information on the research being undertaken into this disease and its vectors.
WHO/OMS: Onchocerciasis
Factsheets, programs, press releases, and research.
Elimination Of River Blindness 'Possible Within Ten Years'
Article from allAfrica.com. (December 14, 2001)
River Blindness 'Breakthrough'
River blindness, which affects about 17 million people, could be wiped out with antibiotics, say scientists. (June 07, 2000)

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March 24, 2016 at 20:35:03 UTC
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