The pantoum is a poetic form derived from the Malaysian pantun. In its modern form, the pantoum consists of an optional number of four-line stanzas, often unrhymed, in which the second and fourth lines of each stanza become the first and third lines of the following stanza. In more ambitious pantoums, the third and first lines of the first stanza become the second and fourth lines of the last stanza, so that the last line of the poem is identical to the first line of the poem. Some pantoums repeat only the first line of the first stanza in the last stanza.
About.com Poetry: Pantoums
A listing of pantoum sites, including definitions, histories, and examples.
Harmonie du soir (Evening Harmony)
A pantoum from Flowers of Evil by Charles Baudelaire. In French and in multiple English translations.
Owl Editing: Sol
A pantoum by Glen Wheeler.
Pantoum, An Explanation
With links to pantoums by Deane P. Goodwin and Mikki Pennington.
Pantoums for Free
A collection by Nicholas Gordon that can be used free for any personal or non-commercial purpose.
Parent's Pantoum
By Carolyn Kizer. Includes RealAudio clip of poet reading the work. Part of The Academy of American Poets Web site.
Poetry Form - The Pantoum
A description and explanation of the form, with examples and a step-by-step guide to writing one.
Poetry Knowledge Zone: Pantoum
Explanation, history, and step-by-step instructions for writing by Smitha Chakravarthula. Includes examples.
Stillbirth
A pantoum about grief by Laure-Anne Bosselar.
Pantoum of the Great Depression
By Donald Justice. Introduced by Robert Haas. (September 20, 1998)
Last update:
August 31, 2016 at 22:23:47 UTC
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